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The duo Hantu (Weber+Delsaux) work with an animist concept of the body, the relation of a being and its environment. Pascale Weber and Jean Delsaux travel regularly: from Plymouth where the first migrants left for America to the rainforest of the shamans of Mentawai who try to keep their ancestral traditions.
The work of the duo in the field of live art, is realised in collaboration with scientists, robotics, biologists, anthropologists and people encountered during their travels. It deals with our relationship with our environment, consciousness and collective our memory, our ghosts.

Hantu (Weber+Delsaux) have realised a body of work consisting of 20 projects, hantu#1 to hantu#20, bringing together texts, songs, films and photography in combination with performance.
These exploratory performances sometimes develop in-situ (Norwegian Lapland, Bogor, Mentawai/Indonesia, Monthelon/France, Plymouth/UK, Taipei…), sometimes in the form of urban renditions (Chapelle historique du Bon Sauveur in Montreal, Kesenian Institute in Jakarta, Palais de Tokyo and Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature or Faculty of Medicine in Paris) without prioritizing resources used whether they are technologically sophisticated or very rudimentary.

Pascale Weber is an essayist (amongst others Les corps flottants– ed. Mots ouverts, 2013, l’Attachement – forthcoming in Oct. 2015) and performer.
She works on our connection to the land and the individual or collective identity (memorial reconstitution and identity construction) particularly by addressing the rites (Indonesian), ghosts of the past and memory of the corps.
She addresses the issue of gender and representations of the feminine body, desire and sexuality. She continuously inscribes her presence and body language with atmospheric element and the vegetable environment.

Jean Delsaux is a visual artist.
His focus is the perception of space and he has realised multiple urban installations on the perception of the vacuum.
His work with multi-screen installations make him experiment with the relations we establish via the image with the world surrounding us, considering image and representation systems.
For him, a work of art is not an object to look at, but a space of experience through which – or in which – we situate ourselves.

More info on http://www.hantu.fr and
http://archee.qc.ca/images/edito-2014-09/diaporama.html

We worked together for the Transtechnology Conference Public Dialogues 2013, Plymouth, Session 6: ‘Artist, Territory, History’ chaired by Edith Doove.

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